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Secrets of the Wallace…Revealed!

Discover the Collection’s secrets for yourself with the launch of an exciting new video podcast series ‘Secrets of the Wallace,’ made by young people especially for you!

Over the next eight weeks discover some of the Wallace Collection’s best-kept secrets, revealed by 16 creative young film makers aged between 14 and 23. These young people took part in a three and a half day film making project at the Wallace Collection over October Half Term. By the end they had created eight video podcasts about some of the most intriguing works of art in the Collection, with the help of staff from the Wallace Collection, the Geffrye Museum and professional film makers from Chocolate Films. Through this series you can find out more about  fascinating works of art, hear from Wallace Collection experts and be inspired to see the real thing at the Wallace Collection.

‘[During the project the young film makers have] created a link between young people and the public by providing a means of communicating the stories behind the Wallace Collection in order to intrigue and entice them’, said one of the  Film Making Project Participant.

 

Podcast Eight: Sèvres Inkstand designed by Jean-Claude Chambellan Duplessis, 1758, by Nicole and Leah (27 December 2013)

Podcast Seven: The Swing by Jean-Honoré Fragonard (1767) by Christobel and Niamh (20 December 2013)

Podcast Six: Gothic Equestrian Armour, c. 1480 by Tomas and Joseph (13 December 2013)

Podcast Five: Four Ice-cream Coolers by Sèvres (1778-1779) by Orlane and Jessica (6 December 2013)

Podcast Four: The Rapier in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries by Katie and Amythyst (29 November 2013)

Podacast Three: Armoire by André-Charles Boullle, Late 17th to early 18th-Century by Emma and Kyle (22 November 2013)

Podcast Two: Princes in the Tower by Hippolyte (Paul) Delaroche, 1831 by Penina and Safirah (15 November 2013)

Podcast One: Hercules and the Bull,  by Sergi and Robert (8 November 2013)

 

We’ll now take you behind the scenes and give you a sneak peek into how the series was made!

 

Behind the Scenes: The Making of the ‘Secrets of the Wallace’ Series

 

Day 1: Getting to Know the Wallace

Project participants initially toured the collection with Wallace Collection staff, before choosing and researching their favourite works of art.

pic-1The group discover some of the treasures of the Wallace Collection, © Geffrye Museum

They then created the story for their films and wrote their scripts, crafting tough questions to ask experts from the Wallace Collection’s Curatorial and Conservation Departments.

pic-1A project participant interviews Curatorial Assistant Carmen Holdsworth-Delgado, © Geffrye Museum

 

Day 2: Lights, Camera, Action!
As the group divided into two production crews, film making trainers from Chocolate Films treated all participants to a ‘crash course’ in camera work, sound recording, lighting, directing and presenting skills. Participants also received practical training in all of the equipment that they would operate on set.

pic-1A film making trainer from Chocolate Films and a project participant work out the best shot, © Geffrye Museum

After setting up their film sets in the galleries, members of each production crew took it in turns to operate the cameras, correctly light the set and record sound, direct a shoot and interview Wallace Collection experts. Visitors to the Collection were treated to mini-film sets being created in the galleries before their very eyes!

pic-1A project participant finds the perfect camera angle, © The Wallace Collection

Members of each production crew even found the time to learn editing techniques on the editing programme Final Cut Pro X and began editing their footage. After a long day of filming and lots of hard work, footage for six films had been shot…phew!

 

Day 3: The Hard Work Continues!
After a busy morning of filming and editing, all eight works of art had been filmed. Now the time had come to head to the editing studio to perfect the films with editing and by adding music, still images and titles. The group also came up with potential names for the overall series and voted for their favourites. ‘Secrets of the Wallace’ was the overall winner with nine votes!
pic-1Project participants hard at work editing their film, © The Wallace Collection

‘Today I know about how to film a good video, looking at the correct lighting, position of the camera, sound and how to use a camera well. Also, [I know] about using the programme used to edit and LOTS of information about objects and paintings in the Wallace Collection’, Film Making Project Participant.

 

Day 4: Adding the Finishing Touches and the Big Showcase
Filmmaking HQ was abuzz as the participants all worked on the final edit of their films, even finding the time to write a synopsis to accompany each film and devise a unique Podcast logo for the series. Friends, family members and Wallace Collection staff then enjoyed a screening, showcasing the films and celebrating the creativity, energy and creativity of the young film makers.

‘I designed a podcast about the Rapiers by using lighting, cameras and sound audio along with computer editing. I found it really helpful to develop skills and my understanding of how to create a podcast. This has helped [the Wallace Collection] because it has helped them advertise the collection and create a better relationship with young people. It was really fun, interesting and I made lots of friends’, Film Making Project Participant.

We hope you’ve enjoyed going behind the scenes to see the making of the series and that you enjoy the ‘Secrets of the Wallace’ video podcast series.

This creative project was generously supported by Arts Council England, and was run in conjunction with the Geffrye Museum and Chocolate Films. The project was planned in collaboration with members of the Geffrye Museum’s Youth Advisory Panel.
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Marie

Posted by Marie
11 November 2013

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